Enhance Creativity in Australia

Posts Tagged ‘education

Read the full detailed article by Michael Michalko, Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking

  1. You are creative
  2. Creative thinking is work
  3. You must go through the motions of being creative
  4. Your brain is not a computer
  5. There is no one right answer
  6. Never stop with your first good idea
  7. Expect the experts to be negative
  8. Trust your instincts
  9. There is no such thing as failure
  10. You do not see things as they are; you see them as you are
  11. Always approach a problem on its own terms
  12. Learn to think unconventionally

Creativity is paradoxical. To create, a person must have knowledge but forget the knowledge, must see unexpected connections in things but not have a mental disorder, must work hard but spend time doing nothing as information incubates, must create many ideas yet most of them are useless, must look at the same thing as everyone else, yet see something different, must desire success but embrace failure, must be persistent but not stubborn, and must listen to experts but know how to disregard them.

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Changing Education Paradigms, Sir Ken Robinson

Understanding the creative mind is certainly a very difficult and abstract topic. To simply put it, creativity is most easily considered in terms of outcomes, e.g. dramatic improvisation and artistic artefacts, but also innovative business ideas and scientific breakthroughs.

Creative thinking is a complex thought process that calls upon many different cognitive functions and and involves many many different regions distributed throughout the brain. There is no single part of our brain responsible for our creativity.

There are certainly no step-by-step instructions for having a good idea, yet multiple psychology reports suggest that our ability to think creatively is influenced by many things, including the environment in which we are surrounded by.

  • Creativity is often regarded as something that is purely spontaneous and less compliant to a teacher’s influence than skills such as planning, calculating and communicating. However, teachers can play a critical role in fostering creative thinking processes through the use of environment and strategy.
  • When we visualise, our brain activity can resemble that associated with real experience. This suggests visualisation is a potentially powerful educational tool. For example, enhancement of generative thinking can be achieved through visualising changes in context.
  • Creative thinking may depend on our ability to use a range of cognitive processes in different ways and crucially, to move between these ways as appropriate.

Soucres

Sir Ken Robinson, PhD is an internationally recognized leader in the development of education, creativity and innovation. He is also one of the world’s leading speakers with a profound impact on audiences everywhere. Seriously, his talks are awe-inspiring, watch them here!

Dr Paul Howard-Jones, Fostering creative thinking: co-constructed insights from the neuroscience and education


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